• Not Literally Slow

    Slow is not meant to be taken literally. As a concept, it is complex and has been described most eloquently by Carl Honoré, in his book In Praise of Slowness. “Fast and Slow do more than just describe a rate of change. They are shorthand for ways of being, or philosophies of life. Fast is busy, controlling, aggressive, hurried, analytical, stressed, superficial, impatient, active, quantity-over-quality. Slow is the opposite: calm, careful, receptive, still, intuitive, unhurried, patient, reflective, quality-over-quantity. It is about making real and meaningful connections – with people, culture, work, food, everything.”

    In my web survey I have come across a few definitions of Slow Architecture that describe it as architecture that literally takes a long time to design and build. The Wikipedia entry cites this definition among others, citing the Sagrada Família, in Barcelona, as an example. I think this misses the point, or rather oversimplifies what I believe is a beautiful and complex idea. The Sagrada Familia certainly is slow in the sense that it is intuitive, unhurried, careful, reflective, deeply meaningful and connected to the site and the people. And it also happens to have taken a long time to build.

    Good architecture inherently resists speed. The creative process is organic, nonlinear, often turbulent and does not wish to be rushed. Any artist knows this. But that does not extend infinitely.  It is simply a matter of taking enough time to do it right.

    Throughout this blog I will be exploring various definitions of Slow Architecture, Slow Building, Slow Design, Slow Home and the term we have coined, Slow Space. This is an open-ended and messy journey that I hope will bring together many different strands into one larger whole.

    Image: “Sagrada Familia” (CC BY-NC 2.0) by aliby